Testing Testing Zaption

20 05 2016

Here is the YouTube video

And here is the Zaption (hopefully)  if not click {here}.

http://zapt.io/tz3zch42 

(apparently it can be embedded but it would take me too long to fiddle with it now as I need to finish my project perhaps later when I have more time, though honestly I don’t think I’d bother.)

https://en-ca.wordpress.org/plugins/zaption/

https://zaption.zendesk.com/hc/en-us/articles/203065655-Can-I-embed-a-Zaption-lesson-into-a-website-

 





Critique Paper 1

12 11 2015

Magda Vince

November 11th, 2015

My article: http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1058486.pdf
Principals’ Perceived Supervisory Behaviors Regarding Marginal Teachers in Two States

This article describes a study in which they looked at how male and female principals identified and managed marginal teachers.  A marginal teacher, as defined by this article, is:

a teacher who is not quite good enough, of middling quality or second rate, or one who manages to perform just well enough to keep their jobs, to the detriment of student learning.

Marginal teachers may have a reasonable handle on the material, but have poor classroom management skills. They are characterized by their negative attitudes about teaching, and also have difficulty or an inability to relate with others, including colleagues, parents, and students.

The main line of defense against marginal, or inadequate, teachers is the principal of the school.  It is known and accepted that that students with ineffective teachers are harmed. Students will likely recover from a single year of having a lower quality instructor, but multiple years under a marginal teacher will lead to lasting problems.  Unfortunately, principals have a lot of responsibilities, leaving little time to properly identify and address the needs of the marginal teachers.

The purpose of conducting this study was to fill the gap there is in the literature on the subject.  They wanted to determine whether male or female principals differ in their views in supervising and evaluating marginal teachers.  They also wished to “expand the understanding of how male and female supervisors view the challenge of identifying and working with marginal teachers, this study examined the perceptions of male and female principals about the identification of marginal teachers and the strategies they use to supervise and evaluate them”.

This study followed a descriptive format, they used an online survey, and used these three questions to guide their study:

  1. What data sources do principals use to identify marginal teachers, and how their views differ by gender?
  2. What supervisory methods do principals use when attempting to improve marginal teachers, and how do their views on the methods differ by gender?
  3. How do principals working with marginal teachers describe their supervisory styles, and do they differ by gender?

They concluded that both male and female principals felt their evaluations of the teachers to be the main source of information when making decisions about marginal teachers.  Classroom walkthroughs and informal observations are their primary diagnostic tool.  Female principals leaned toward a procedural supervisory style, while male principals had a more situational style. Female principals were more inclined to consider outside opinions, such as other supervisors, parents, students and even teacher self-evaluation than their male counterparts.  This study also corroborated other studies that indicated that there was a pattern of female support concerning data sources. That female principals value instruction and perceive their supervisory role as important, they have strong instructional leadership and are more involved with the teacher on a personal level.

—–

I found it interesting that this study seems to indicate female principals are more likely to manage using a style with procedures, documents and data while their male counterparts may be more inclined to just go with their ‘gut’.  I agree that many female leaders can be more, at least seemingly, interested in the lives of their staff, but on the other hand I find many female supervisors feel they have something to prove.  They can be as tough as the next guy and make it their mission to prove it, while male supervisors may either be strict and firm or friendly and jovial.  I, personally, feel this more often comes down to an individual’s personality and circumstance far more than anything related to their sex.

In this study they only surveyed two states, one in the Midwest and another in the Rocky Mountains.  I would be interested to see how the data varied with a larger pool of principals and in different areas.  For example: the southern, northern, eastern and western states or non-continental USA, how about Europe, Asia, Canada or South Africa?  I have a feeling the results would vary strongly in these different regions and would likely reflect the sexual equality and attitudes toward female and male roles in those societies.

I found the article to be well written and put together. Data charts helped demonstrate the relevant numbers and how they related to one another.  When I finished reading, the first thing I thought was that it was leaning rather heavily on the side of female principals being more effective, involved and possibly better managers of the teachers and therefore the school.  I immediately wondered if the authors were female, if they had been all female or even more than half, I would have been inclined to think that this article was biased toward women.  But given only one of the cited authors of the study was a female researcher it seems less likely to be women touting the glory of women.

If there were more information about the relationship in areas with less gender equality, I would try to use this information to tailor how I would interact with my principals in Taiwan.  But as is the cultural differences are significant, I do not believe that the data provided in this study is particularly relevant to my current situation.  If I ever transfer to a North American location, it would be interesting to see how my personal experiences and behaviour would be affected by the differences between male and female supervisors.





EDUC 921 Pre Course Paper

8 11 2015

EDUC 921    Pre Course Paper

Magda Vince

November 5th, 2015

At first I had no idea what to write, it should have been easy, I should have known my personal philosophy in education.  My personal philosophy in education is not really something that I have given a ton of thought.  I balked at it because I found the task to be a daunting one, but ultimately this is good for me because I need to clearly think and write about my philosophy for my full application to the program at Framingham.  I was not sure how to proceed, as we have not been given examples or guidance on what is expected.  I looked online, read some examples and realized, hopefully correctly, that I should be writing about what I personally consider to be important in education and teaching.  If I have incorrectly identified the objective, I apologize.

There are many things that I consider to be very important to keep in mind in regards to what I am teaching and trying to achieve in the classroom.  As teachers, we have a responsibility to not only educate the children academically but to help shape them into responsible, ethical and good people.  It is not just about imparting information and knowledge, it is about making sure that they understand the importance of honesty, integrity and a job well done.

It is very important to make learning engaging and exciting.  I find ways to hit on students’ personal interests. If I can get them involved and excited about a topic it will have a greater impact on them.  It is of the utmost importance to try to make personal connections with my students to help them feel more comfortable talking to me in and out of class.  If they like me they will be more inclined to listen and learn, and if I take the time to get to know and like them I will be more invested in their future and comprehension.  This is especially true in Taiwan where a lot of the kids spend the vast majority of their time at school with their teachers. It is important to make the kids feel cared about and safe in the class room.  There is a culture of perfection here, it is not acceptable to not know or to be wrong.

An amusing example of this that happened often in the past was to ask for directions and have someone confidently explain how to get to a destination, only to discover that the person had no idea. Rather than admit it, they gave random directions hoping someone else help upon becoming lost.   In the classroom this translates to quiet, shy kids that are extremely hesitant to speak up in class.  They do not like to ask questions because that is an admission of ignorance.  I make a point with every new class to emphasis the importance of asking questions, encouraging their natural curiosity and helping them shed their cultural inhibitions.  I want them to feel safe to admit when they do not know something, and to realize that we all have questions and things we do not know.  For this reason I always admit when I do not know something. If I make a mistake I own it, I correct it, and we move on.  I lead by example and show that it is ok to not know or make mistakes if an effort is made to learn from it in the future.

Something I always strive for as a teacher is to ultimately make myself obsolete.  I teach my students to be independent, giving them the tools to succeed on their own.  I give them independent study skills, test taking skills, and the confidence to dissect an assignment on their own.  I am always available to help, but I expect them to try to complete tasks on their own.  They, eventually, are able to complete the majority of assignments with little to no intervention on my part.  I also make my classroom student centered as often as I can, because it is important that they are invested in what they are learning.  In my experience I have observed that students are more engaged and invested when we incorporate student centered learning into the classroom.

Communication is key to the success of any relationship.  That is why I always have an open communication policy with students, parents, colleagues and even administration.  With the students I am open and honest with them, as much as appropriate.  If I feel sick or if a particular class or assignment is important, I simply take time to discuss it with them.  They know what it is like to be sick or sad and are very understanding when time is taken to explain my mindset to them.  If a class or assignment is important, and it is explained why, they will have far more respect for it and me for discussing it with them.

I have an open classroom, anyone is welcome to come observe at any time.  In addition I often share plans, ideas, activities and classes that I plan to do or that have gone particularly well with my colleagues and administrators.  This is an important attitude to have as an educator; I get a lot from sharing with others as they share with me as well.  Sharing my accomplishments keeps me excited about what I am doing.

As for parents, I find that most problems often come down to misunderstandings or a lack of trust.  I speak with parents often and am sure that they know they are welcome to ask me anything about the class or their kids.  In addition, I started a class blog to share what we have been doing with pictures, worksheets, videos and even communications with the parents.  So far this has been very well received, the kids love it and the parents are delighted to be able to see pictures of activities and watch videos that we have watched in our class.  It encourages parental involvement and also helps the parents feel more confident in myself as their children’s educator.

Good instruction is made up of clear, understandable directions and material.  It’s important to consider the audience, and make the lessons level appropriate.  There is nothing worse than going to a class to have the book or teacher aimed a mile above students’ head.  It is frustrating and discouraging to the students, and shows a lack of connection and possibly disinterest or even worse apathy on the part of the instructor.

Instruction should be succinct and meaningful.  Assignments, lectures, readings and activities need to be useful, not just busy work.  It is also important to keep things as interesting as possible, depending on the subject matter. If a class or lesson is fun, or personalized to the students, it will have a far greater impact.  Student centered activities are a great way to get students involved and keep them interested in the subject matter.  It can also help when trying to make potentially unexciting material more personal and interesting.

Good supervision is something that is easy to speculate about but to be frank, in my experience, a little harder to find.  I would ideally like my supervisors to be fair but firm.  Again, communication is extremely important, I expect my supervisors to communicate clearly and honestly with me.  It is important to be able to talk to administration and that they are approachable, not kings on the mountain.  It is also important to know that they will listen, trust, and be supportive in a conflict or dispute.

One school, that I ultimately did not work at but was really looking forward to the positive environment, the director of the English department was personable, open and easy to talk to.  All the teachers that worked under her confirmed that she listened to the staff and took their feelings and perspectives into consideration.  When it came to reports from parents or complaints she always supported the teacher, regardless of what was said. Her first take was that of support of the teaching staff, and she reserved judgment of the situation until after discussing with the teachers in question.  I, personally, have not experienced that kind of support in schools in Taiwan.  The usual maneuver here is to assume the teachers are in the wrong without even discussing it with them, and then trying to do damage control to clean up the mess afterwards.  The party line for a lot of teachers is to constantly do everything you can to ‘cover your ass’ in case anything goes wrong.  I have yet to run into problems of this kind at my current job, but I have heard that our administrator is quite busy but tends to try to trust the staff, which I hope is the case.

What helped me the most to become a successful teacher?  Well, in part I would say that my own personality is the main driving force behind my success.  I really enjoy teaching, I get excited when I reach the kids and get them involved in a lesson.  I like to learn new things, but I have a short attention span and am easily bored.  As a result, I am constantly driven to try harder to make my lessons interesting, to spice things up, which keeps me and the kids interested and excited.

Also, this program has been a large positive influence for me as a teacher.  Not so much the courses themselves, they have been useful and informative, the most important thing that I have gotten from the program is a reigniting of my passion for teaching.  I had lost the spark, and was seriously considering leaving education and pursuing a different career.  I was extremely unhappy, especially after a very negative experience with unprofessional and shockingly poor management at my previous school.  When I left, we had nine foreign homeroom teachers, and that year six of the nine left the school permanently, and one transferred to a different department.  I attempted to transfer as well, but it did not work out.  The coordinator left mid-year, and her replacement left in June, three of the teachers were so ‘scarred’ by the experience that they left the country, two more left the city.  In the aftermath, I felt so disillusioned that while I changed schools, I was honestly considering leaving not only teaching but leaving Taiwan which has been my home for the past 14 years.

I decided to join the Framingham Master’s in International Education, to improve my resume and in the hopes to improve my situation if not now, at least in the future.  I knew that I would learn new things, meet new, people and have new experiences.  What I did not anticipate was the affirmation that I am actually good at my job, that I am a good teacher, and the realization that I still have a lot to offer.  The interactions, shared experiences, and lively discussions that I have engaged in with my classmates have made a world of difference to me personally and professionally.  I have learned about education and teaching, but most importantly I have learned about myself.  I have also made valuable connections and hopefully have improved my prospects for the future.





Hope?

6 11 2015

I didn’t vote for him.

I couldn’t even if I wanted to because my right to vote was taken away.

I have recently and rapidly become ashamed of my country and what it has become.  Especially approaching the election.  I was disheartened, enraged, embarrassed, and even ashamed of my country.  I have been an expat for 14 years, I have often joked and jested about my homeland, but it has always been just that.  I refused to even consider giving up my citizenship, not because the Canadian passport is ‘better’, which is of course a factor.  But because deep down, Canada will always be a part of me and my home, no matter where I go, where I live, where my new home may be.  Canada is part of me, part of who I am, shaped me, and ultimately a huge part of my identity.

In the short time since the election, I have been nervously watching to see what our new Prime Minister would do.  He’s a politician, and … well they can be a shady bunch.  He’s done a number of things that may well, come lets be honest they are, publicity stunts.  But at the same time, he’s doing them.  And let’s consider, all people in the lime light do things to get your attention but what are they doing?  Regardless of why, what are they doing?

He ran a clean and positive campaign.

Meeting people in the morning after the election in the metro to shake hands and say thank you.

He used google hangouts, to reach out and chat with school children across the country about issues and their concerns.

Continually talking about, and making real moves toward, transparency in the government.

He promised a cabinet that was gender equal… and then he actually did it. 0.0

Speaking of the cabinet… I’ve heard some grumbling about how, it should be based on qualifications not getting the job for being a woman.  <- ok holy fuck off.. because all the men in the previous cabinets were the best candidate?  Like there aren’t any freaking qualified women in government?  Really.?  HUFF

When he was asked why he made a gender equal cabinet, his answers was simple “because it’s 2015”.

But seriously look at this..

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/politics/the-trudeau-cabinet-read-the-full-list-ofministers/article27095965/

In case you haven’t seen this floating around

https://www.facebook.com/alanaphillips?pnref=story

These are some of the cabinet members…

We have a Minister of Environment and CLIMATE CHANGE.
We have a Minister of Immigration, Citizenship and REFUGEES.

Our Prime Minister is a sci-fi geek.
Our Minister of Health is an actual Doctor.
Our Minister of Families, Children and Social Development is a poverty economist.
Our Minister of Science is an actual Scientist (oh, and she has a Nobel Prize).
Our Minister of Status of Women is an actual woman!
Our Minister of Veterans Affairs is a quadriplegic because he was shot in a drive-by shooting.
Our Minister of Employment, Workforce Development and Labour is a Professional Geologist.
Our Minister of Democratic Institutions is a Muslim refugee.
Our Minister of Sport and Persons with Disabilities is a Paralympian Athlete.
Our Minister of Defence is a badass war hero, Afghanistan combat vet, and police officer.
OUR MINISTER OF TRANSPORT IS A GODDAMN ASTRONAUT.

Half of our Ministers are women.
Half of our Ministers are men!
Two of our Ministers are people of First Nations (Kwakwaka’wakw, Inuit)
Three of our Ministers were born outside of Canada (India, Afghanistan)
Two of our Ministers are Sikh.
At least one of our Ministers is Muslim.
At least two of our Ministers are Atheist.
One of our Ministers is battling breast cancer. frown emoticon
One of our Ministers is in a wheelchair.
One of our Ministers is blind.
One of our Ministers is openly gay.
One of our Ministers is openly ginger.
Also, Hon. Navdeep Bains has a perfect twirly moustache.

Justin, if these are signs of what is to come, how you plan to run our country.  I breathe a sigh of relief.  I didn’t vote for you, but you’ve given me my Canada back, or at least have started to.  I am proud of my country again.  And I had a little hitch in my breath, my heart skipped a beat when I read his open letter to the country.  If nothing else, thank you for giving me hope.

http://www.liberal.ca/prime-minister-justin-trudeaus-open-letter-to-canadians/





Dear Fellow Canadians, We Need to Talk. (Part II)

5 10 2015

[Link to Part One]

A quick recap

  1. Nazis were bad
  2. Some business about coming for people who aren’t me
  3. Environmental stuff <– meh, doesn’t effect me
  4. Human rights violation something or other <– meh, doesn’t effect me
  5. Activists and protesters could be terrorists and arrested <– meh, doesn’t effect me
  6. Dual citizens are now second class citizen who can looks their Canadian passport with no due process  <– meh, doesn’t effect me

If you’re lucky enough to have actually gotten all the way through there with the ‘doesn’t affect me’s, um.. Kudos? But remember good ole Martin?  Here let me toss that in here in case you’ve forgotten.

First they came for the Socialists, and I did not speak out—
Because I was not a Socialist.

Then they came for the Trade Unionists, and I did not speak out—
Because I was not a Trade Unionist.

Then they came for the Jews, and I did not speak out—
Because I was not a Jew.

Then they came for me—and there was no one left to speak for me.

I am guilty, I have been guilty.  Even the dual citizenship, I mean that’s complete crap but it doesn’t effect me.

And then they came for me.

I’ve never been politically minded or even vaguely interested.  But at some point you have say hang on a minute, what are the people who are running our country doing?  Maybe it’s because I’m getting older, growing up?  Realizing I can’t just sit idly by while someone does something horrible because that makes me complacent?   But in the last couple of years I’ve started to take note, and thinking I need to get more involved, more active.  I certainly need to be exercising my right to vote, it’s my responsibility as a citizen of this nation to educate myself on the issues and vote.

Now in fairness, the removal of the right for expats to vote was done a while ago, but it was overturned. In May (2014) last year, Superior Court Justice Michael Penny threw out the voting ban, noting that mass murderers have the right to cast ballots but long-term expats who care deeply about the country do not. Penny also said expats could well be subject to Canadian tax and other laws.

But this July (2015) it was reinstated, how convenient, just before the federal election.  But… what about the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, which came into effect on April 17, 1982? Under section 3:

Every citizen of Canada has the right to vote in an election of members of the House of Commons or of a legislative assembly [of a province or territory] and to be qualified for membership therein.

I’m a Citizen.  Why can’t I vote?  I am subject to laws and taxes in Canada.  Why can’t I vote?

In 1993 they passed  Bill C-114, which in part “removed voting disqualifications for judges, people with mental disabilities and inmates serving less than two years in correctional institutions.  And extended the use of the special ballot, enabling any elector to register and vote without having to appear in person on election day or at an advance poll”

Hang on, let me see if I have this straight, long term criminals, murders, rapists and the like, have a charter given right to vote.  Because they are citizens.  But because I reside in a different country, in which I maintain my Canadian passport and citizenship, I do not get to vote.  Ok, that makes perfect sense (no it doesn’t).

But you’re probably thinking… <– meh, doesn’t effect me

Wake up and smell the shit storm of disgustingness!!!!  Revoking the citizenship of Canadians?  Labeling people who are protesting a pipeline that has potentially horrible environmental consequences as terrorists???? Taking away the right, the RIGHT WE HAVE HAD SINCE 1982, to vote?  None of this is bad enough for you?

Ok, fine.  How about this little disgusting bit of xenophobic trash and racism?

The whole niqab issue that is blowing up in the press. The woman who wanted to wear her niqab during the citizenship ceremony, and no no no.  Worse yet according to polls most people seem to agree it’s just not on.  If this is how you feel, I’m going to give you the benefit of the doubt, you’ve probably not thought about it much and just thought “hey that’s, yeah, weird I don’t like it”

Let me explain it to you, it’s not about confirming her identity, that was done in interviews and during the whole citizenship process in which she was required to show her face to female agents. So forget it being about security, it’s not.  It’s not about women’s rights as some have tried to make it seem, that no one should ever tell a woman that she must cover her face and that these women want to do so is only because they have be brain washed to do so.  Even if that is true, I’m not even saying it’s not.

A woman is an adult, and socially conditioned or not, if she doesn’t feel comfortable showing her face in a group of mixed company she shouldn’t have to.

Think about it this way, there are many conservative religious groups in the world, that have ‘odd’ practices.  Some always cover their hair, only their husband can see their hair.  Some wear little hats.  Some eat little cookies and drink wine claiming it to be blood and flesh. Some wear head, or face coverings. Some wear skirts only.  Some won’t wear anything modern, with zippers and velcro.  Others still wear orange and shave their heads.  And that is their right, as long as they are not hurting anyone else with their beliefs they can do so.

A prominent Canadian Leader was quoted as saying

I will never tell my young daughter that a woman should cover her face because she’s a woman

Hear hear!  But… why do you think it’s ok to tell a woman who according to her faith and her beliefs, whether you agree with them or not, that she must show her face?

Imagine there was a society that went topless all the time, it was a matter of pride for the women to show their bare breasts as a badge of honor of their femininity.  And they met one of us, and thought us so strange that we covered our breasts.  How degrading, that we have be taught to cover ourselves, we’ve been brainwashed by the misogynistic men in our society.  We’re just confused.  Should they then tear our clothing from our bodies? to force us to live their way?  We need to be enlightened like they are, they must force us to join their correct way.

Again, you’re probably thinking <– meh, doesn’t effect me

And then I see this, and this my friends, my fellow Canadians, this was the straw that broke my camel’s back.  It wasn’t even when they came for me, because meh screw em.  But when I saw this this morning, I felt sick.   {link}

pledging that a re-elected Tory government would establish a tip line for reporting “barbaric cultural practices”

Don’t be fooled by the window dressing, of it’s to protect young girls being forced into early marriages.  Or to help abuse victims. Or to protect us.  Because that is not what it is, it’s a hotline to report anyone you don’t like, especially if they have strange cultural practices.

Seriously?  What happened to the Canada that celebrated diversity?  The Canada, that when faced with the issue of a Sikh RCMP officer wanting to be able to wear his headdress, ruled in his favour?  Sure people bitched and moaned and many didn’t like it, but the Law stood for the rights and diversity of our nation.  Did we learn nothing from the Americans literally THROWING their rights away after 911?  Snowden telling everyone that the government was indeed abusing the shit out of these ‘safety protocols’

Can’t you see? This is how it starts.  This is how it has started in the past…. Do I think we’ll be another Germany with another Holocaust and spark a world war?  No…We as a people would never let something like that happen. Not here, not now.

I bet if you asked Germans in the 1920’s if they thought the same thing, they would have scoffed and said don’t be preposterous.  We’d never let something like that happen, not here.

What’s next Canada?  Marriage equality? The right to chose?  The right to a fair trial?  We’ve only had those since 2005, 1988, and I’m not even sure.. but it’s way back there.  But then again so was the right of every Canadian to vote.

And if you’ve read all this, and you still think.  Well it’s not that big of a deal, or there isn’t really a problem.  Then you, my dear, are the problem.  





Dear Fellow Canadians, We Need to Talk. (Part I)

4 10 2015

Have you ever met a German?  You know anyone from Germany?  I have, and like all people some of them suck, but the vast majority of them are quite lovely people.  But wait, makes you wonder doesn’t it?  I mean how did that whole Nazi party, thing happen?  I mean sure a lot of Germans are a little fussy, tidy, punctual etc. but evil Nazi types, not really.  But we all, well except Alex Johnstone, know about the holocaust, the Nazi reign, and World War II. So if Germans aren’t a particularly stupid or evil people, how in hell did that all happen?  How did the people not stand up and say, “Whoa hold on, you can’t do this!”  Ever wonder?

There is a famous quote, by Martin Niemöller, a prominent Protestant pastor who emerged as an outspoken public foe of Adolf Hitler and spent the last seven years of Nazi rule in concentration camps.

First they came for the Socialists, and I did not speak out—
Because I was not a Socialist.

Then they came for the Trade Unionists, and I did not speak out—
Because I was not a Trade Unionist.

Then they came for the Jews, and I did not speak out—
Because I was not a Jew.

Then they came for me—and there was no one left to speak for me.

Mmmm, I’m sure you’re all nodding sagely at this point and wondering what this has to do with you.  I mean, Germany in the 1930’s and Canada in the 2010’s, how is there any connection?

Maybe there isn’t, maybe I’m being dramatic, that’s what people will say.  That’s likely what people said about Martin, or anyone who though “gee… this isn’t right” when shit started in Germany.

What’s my point?  Well, I’m pretty horrified by what’s happening in Canada right now.  Never mind the environmental atrocities and horrors that have been happening, or the selling out human rights for a few bucks (FIPA).  The childish and dirty pool politics coming up to the elections.  <- all of which I’ve turned a blind eye to for the past few years, because you know I was not ‘a Socialist’ or ‘Trade Unionist’ or even a ‘Jew’.  Doesn’t really affect me so meh.  I’m very guilt of being complacent.  And now I realize my error, oh they have come for me, and it’s too late.

Don’t know what I’m talking about?  Let’s start with Bill C-51, which  has the potential to scoop up environmentalists, aboriginal rights activists, union members and anyone who is seen to stand in the way of national security.  The act’s interpretation states that it applies to any activity that “undermines the sovereignty, security or territorial integrity of Canada or the lives or the security of the people of Canada.” This includes the following: “Interference with the capability of the Government of Canada in relation to intelligence, defense, border operations, public safety, the administration of justice, diplomatic or consular relations, or the economic or financial stability of Canada.”

So, the First Nations people who are blocking the pipeline from being built on their land?  Rightfully so by the way, the pipeline has no right to build on their land.. but you know they are messing with the financial stability of Canada.  Dirty terrorists.

But I’m not first nations, I’m not an activist or protester… so you know whatever right?

How about Bill C-24, that allows the Canadian Government can now revoke the citizenship of Canadians holding dual citizenship. Plus it only applies to immigrants, not natural born Canadians.  Wrong.  It creates an inferior class of Canadians, whose citizenship can be revoked at the whim of the government. While many assume that the provisions only apply to “new” Canadians, whose primary allegiance may rest with their country of birth and initial citizenship, even though, as a matter of convenience they have also acquired a Canadian passport, this is incorrect: even citizens born in this country, with Canadian heritage going back many generations, can lose their citizenship if they also hold another passport.

You might be thinking but it’s not like they are just going to run around taking passports from people because they don’t like them, you’d need to be like REALLY bad.  A traitor, a terrorist, some kind of hideous criminal, right? Wrong.  They’ve already started taking citizenship away, Paul Watson lost the right to come home without any shred of due process. No hearing, no right to challenge the decision, no appeal. {link} <-google it if you want to know more … it’s terrifying.

But, I mean, come on I don’t have dual citizenship… so it doesn’t affect me.

Tell me your sensing a pattern at this point. If you’re not… sigh. <- you’re what’s wrong with our country right now.

To be continued…..  (because It’s going to be ‘too long didn’t read’ otherwise)

[Link to Part Two]





Protected: The Plot Thickens!!!! (ask)

23 06 2015

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